Made in China and so cool… the trendiest sneakers on the market

Sneakers mania? Yes is still on!And China has a surprise on this regard as, if you wanna go local, you have quite a choice here.The charming, Shanghai made “Warriors”, known on the local market as Hui Li (回力), were born back in the ‘20ies, being so the earliest Chinese rubber-soled shoes, and are a footwear favourite in China since the 60ies.During the Cultural Revolution era the Hui Li gym shoes were such a desirable object for the average Chinese that they were likely to be swiped off if the lucky owner dared to go out wearing them.A similar history for another Shanghai brand, Fei yue, which in Chinese means roughly “flying over”. This company has been long known for its production of the more comfortable and flexible kung fu and martial art shoes on the market and different varieties of “tennis” style shoes.

The selection of the foot wear is very much essential for the success. Apart from success, it plays an important role in the health of a person. There are some shoes that cause stress on the foot resulting in pain. The pain if left unattended will result in result in serious and severe pain. There are many ways for this personal care in the Nature Tricks.

I checked with my Chinese friends the reason of such a long success; they say these shoes are light in weight  and (still) very cheap, just 20 to 60 rmb (few euro), at least if you buy them locally. My trendy Chinese language teacher Xiao Hua added that nowadays the two brands are especially loved because of their real vintage look. And the youngster are proud because they are made locally.From the eighties local sneakers had a dull moment though, which ended after the Beijing Olympic games:  hundreds of performers all dressed in white, wore the Fei yue at the Opening ceremony, giving back to the “retro” traditional brands their popularity.Local sports or work shoes inspired also western designers.In 2005 the entrepreneur Patrice Bastian redesigned and launched a French version of the Fei yue which is doing very well on the European market.The common canvas and rubber “jie fan xie” – the liberation shoes –  worn by millions of workers China wide, from miners to constructions workers, caught the eye of the American Ben Walters instead.So he created the OSPOP (One Small Point of Pride) shoes.  They don’t lack in authenticity flavour when it comes to the look but of course have been revisited in terms of comfort and materials and are available in fancy colors and different shapes.OSPOP are still “proudly made in China” but the brand, in the beginning, likely due to pricing reasons, was only targeting the Overseas market. Now that a trend has been set among the western hipsters, OSPOP is  giving a try on the local market with a flagship store to open in Shanghai and an on-line shop on Tao Bao, the biggest web market place in China.Watch out for their red logo showcasing the character 工 “gong” (labor)!What about the Kung Fu shoes? They too have been revamped under the colorful brand K-FU for the pleasure of home life or for some relaxed walking and they are displaying their bright colours and surprising fantasies in the trendiest windows of Shanghai.If you are wondering about me… sure I do have a pair of white and bright red Warriors, the timeless WB 1 model: I could not miss the wave.www.feiyue-shoes.comhttp://www.ospop.com/http://www.warriorshoes.com/enhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feiyuehttp://www.nlgx.com/2011/09/30/kfu-shoes-now-available-at-nanluoguxiang/http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/08/2008_olympics_opening_ceremony.html

warriorsSneakers mania? Yes it is still on! And China has a surprise on this regard as, if you wanna go local, you have quite a choice here.

The charming, Shanghai made “Warriors“, known on the local market as Hui Li (回力), were born back in the ‘20ies, being so the earliest Chinese rubber-soled shoes. They are the most favorite footwear in China since the ´60s.

During the Cultural Revolution era the Hui Li gym shoes were such a desirable object for the average Chinese that they were likely to be swiped off if the lucky owner dared to go out wearing them.

A similar history for another Shanghai brand, Fei yue, which in Chinese means roughly “flying over”. This company has been long known for the production of the most comfortable and flexible kung fu and martial art shoes on the market and different varieties of “tennis” style shoes.

I checked with my Chinese friends the reason of such a long success. They say that these shoes are light in weight  and (still) very cheap, just 20 to 60 rmb (few euro), at least if you buy them locally. My trendy Chinese language teacher Xiao Hua added that nowadays the two brands are especially loved because of their real vintage look. And the youngsters are proud because they are made locally.

In the ´80s the local sneakers had a dull moment though, which ended after the Beijing Olympic games when hundredsoly13-1 of performers all dressed in white, wore the Fei yue at the Opening ceremony, giving back the popularity to the “retro” traditional brands.

Local sports or work shoes inspired also western designers.

In 2005 the entrepreneur Patrice Bastian redesigned and launched a French version of the Fei yue which is doing very well on the European market.

The common canvas and rubber “jie fan xie” – the liberation shoes –  worn by millions of workers China wide, from miners to constructions workers, caught the eye of the American Ben Walters instead. He created the OSPOP (One Small Point of Pride) shoes. They don’t lack in authenticity flavour when it comes to the look but of course they have been revisited in terms of comfort and materials and are available in fancy colors and different shapes.

ospospsOSPOP are still “proudly made in China” but the brand, in the beginning, likely due to pricing reasons, was only targeting the Overseas market. Now that a trend has been set among the western hipsters, OSPOP is  giving a try on the local market with a flagship store to open in Shanghai and an on-line shop on Tao Bao, the biggest web market place in China.

Watch out for their red logo showcasing the character 工 “gong” (labor)!

What about the Kung Fu shoes? They too have been revamped under the colorful brand K-FU for the pleasure of home life or for some relaxed walking and they are displaying their bright colours and surprising fantasies in the trendiest windows of Shanghai.

If you are wondering about me… sure I do have a pair of white and bright red Warriors, the timeless WB 1 type: I could not miss the wave!